Armistice Resource for Rememberance Day

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Rememberance Day this year not only (fittingly) falls on a Sunday, but is a very special occasion too. A special Armistice worship resource had been created for this day, ready for congregations to use and adapt.

The Centre for Music, Liturgy and the Arts, together with Defence Chaplain Rev Sue page, has put together the wonderful resource that congregations and faith communities may use in their service. The resource can be used either as a full congregational service or as parts of a service where a variety of ways of acknowledging the day could be offered.

This particular Rememberance Day will commemorate 100 years since fighting seized in World War One. 11:00am on Sunday 11 November 2018 is, therefore, a once in a century moment. In that moment we will remember those who had lost their lives in war as we reflect on the armistice (suspension of fighting) that was called exactly 100 year earlier. It was the moment when the guns on the Western Front fell silent after more than four years of continuous warfare. In November 1918 the Germans called for an armistice in order to secure a peace settlement. They accepted allied terms that amounted to unconditional surrender.

The 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month attained a special significance in the post-war years. To date, more than 102 000 Australian servicemen and women have lost their lives in combat. It is because of their sacrifice that we can live in a free society today. Red poppies are worn on blazers, shirts, jumpers and other items of clothing on Remembrance Day to remember those who died during a war. Poppies were among the first plants that came from the battlefields of northern France and Belgium during World War I.

Download the free resource here.

 


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